Bezhin lea

Share via Email Risky crossings Alamy For me, part of the compelling energy of short stories comes from the way they can cross boundaries. More than simply geographic, these boundaries can be crossed in acts of transgression or empathy, in shifts of understanding or emotion and formal innovation.

Bezhin lea

After a day of grouse shooting, the hunter who narrates the story starts homeward but becomes lost as night approaches. Growing increasingly uneasy as he wanders beside a wood, then along the boundary of a field, around a knoll, and into a hollow, he stops short at the very edge of an abyss.

At the bottom of the precipice he can barely perceive a broad river and a vast plain; Bezhin lea now knows where he is and descends to Bezhin Meadow, where five boys are clustered around two fires while keeping watch over a drove of grazing horses.

The narrator describes the boys, who range in age from fourteen to seven. The one who stands out from the others is twelve-year-old Pavlusha, who appears to be the leader, as the narrator, lying quietly apart from the boys, observes while listening to their conversation. The conversation around the fire resumes, again concerning tales about the dead, the supernatural, wood-demons, and water sprites.

The boys share the few potatoes they have been cooking in a small pot, and Pavlusha goes off for some water. When he returns, they settle down to sleep in the deep silence that precedes dawn.

The hunter awakes just before sunrise, nods goodbye to Pavlusha, the only one of the boys who wakes up, and sets off for home as the sun rises and everything returns to life—the river, the hills, the creatures of the meadow.

Bezhin lea

He hears a bell, then the drove of horses passes him, chased by the boys. In the last paragraph, the hunter adds regretfully that Pavlusha died some months later in a fall from a horse.In “Bezhin Lea” (or “Bezhin Meadow” or “Bezhin Prairie”), the hunter gets lost after a long day of hunting.

In the darkening twilight, he comes across a group of young peasant boys, with whom he . This book contains the stories "Loner", "Bezhin Lea", and "Bailiff" from the famous series "Hunting Sketches" by the great Russian writer Ivan Sergeyevich Turgenev ().

Bezhin Lea In this story, the writer seems to pay extra attention to his word choice as well as the manner in which he conveys the images for the reader, especially in . Bezhin Lea In this story, the writer seems to pay extra attention to his word choice as well as the manner in which he conveys the images for the reader, especially in .

A Critical Appreciation of Turgenev's "Bezhin Meadow" Uploaded by Mike Mendis A Master's level essay presenting a literary analysis of Ivan Turgenev's masterpiece "Bezhin Meadow," including an analysis of theme, plot, style, tone, and characters ( words).

This book contains the stories "Loner", "Bezhin Lea", and "Bailiff" from the famous series "Hunting Sketches" by the great Russian writer Ivan Sergeyevich Turgenev ().

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